Friday, 17 October 2014

Limone Xtreme skyrace


"You seem like you've been in a gladiator fight" said the commentary lady jabbing a microphone in my face 30 seconds after finishing.

"Maybe that's a bit melodramatic but I certainly feel like I've been in battle out there" I reply.


I wasn't the only one.
The boys carnage after finishing, including Arc'teryx teammate Florian Reichart.
Photo from Skyrunning Italia facebook page.


Ideally I'd be writing this blog about how I fought through the elements on my way to a top performance but sport doesn't always present the perfect story. Instead I find myself describing the fight that ended with average position on the results board, however that shouldn't take away from a race that really lived up to its name as the 'Xtreme SkyRace'.



The front of the race leading the way through the streets of Limone-sul-Garda.
The limoncello stand on the right an optional first drinks point.
From the Limone Xtreme facebook page


The start is on the edge of Lake Garda and like all the best Italian races, the first km involves weaving through narrowed cobbled town streets cheered on by fans, spectators and confused tourists. There's a supposedly flat 2km section before the hill starts but that was only in a relative sense as it was still bumpy.

Then the hill starts for real. And never seems to stop. The race may only be 24km long but you're still climbing at 16km. I don't want to give the impression it's a gradual slope either - about 1200m climb in 7km is fairly wall-like.


Jono Wyatt produced a really cool video showing the course profile.
Either click the image or here is the link to his facebook page

Up we all go! From the Limone Facebook page 



I think the trick with these sorts of initial climbs is to make them as uneventful as possible. Later on in a race even the smallest bumps seem like mountains and so it's important to have something in the mind and legs to survive them. This was certainly my aim but I picked up a stitch after having a larger than expected piece of dry fruit at an aid station (it's always the little things!) there was no real option other than to run it off so I just kept going knowing that it couldn't last three hours so I was going to have to feel better at some point.

After a bit of a lethal downhill we were back on the climb to the highest point of the course at 1600m negotiating the tricky trail in cloud with about 10m visibility. I caught a struggling but ever-smiling Emelie Forsberg who helped distract me from the pain (it was more talking-intensity for her than me though).



The cloud came in - a photo from the amazing Jordi Saragossa.
His facebook here - his website here


But what comes up must come down... Oh dear, it was quite muddy. After three falls in the first hundred metres I realised this was going to be an interesting one. It may not have been the most sensible tactic but I figured I just needed to throw myself down faster. Backwards logic but if you haven't got any brakes then don't rely on them. It was about this point that thunder rolled across the valley and the heavens opened. Admittedly I did need a shower. There wasn't really much for it other than to plough on and make a joke of it in who knows what language with the other runners.



Just throw yourself off the hill - it will be fine!
Found image here


Finally it was time for the bonus climbs (the published course profile was more artistic than accurate). The ups were now as muddy as the downs as the rain had hit when all the top men were going through this section and it had become like a good old Scottish XC course, except on a 45 degree slope. We were hanging onto branches to pull ourselves up and grabbing them on the way down in the hope of gaining some control.

After quite a few false shouts of "100m to the last summit" we seemed to finally turn for home. The slightly scary thought of being 1300m above the finish and only having 7km left to run crossed my mind but it wasn't like I fancied a longer route home either. The descent was fantastic and ridiculous at the same time. On the rare moments that I could take my eyes off the path, the views of Lake Garda were stunning.


Kilian showing everyone how to descend.

.....And collapse. After negotiating cameras, commentators and other runners with similar levels of energy and coordination to me, I made it to Arc'teryx team-mate Florian and some others who had already made use of Lake Garda's recovery powers.


From Jordi's twitter 
Just scraped into the prizes in 10th place winning a hamper of
limoncello, red wine, smoked trout and pasta. Dinner!


That may well have been one of the last battles I'll have with the hills for a while and it was as always perversely enjoyable. I'm not sure what next season holds for me in that respect but I know that I will be returning at some point for some more 'type 2 fun'.

As this season draws to a close it is an appropriate time to say a massive thanks to Arc'teryx who have given me the opportunity to test myself against the biggest hills in Europe and against the best runners in the world over the last three seasons. I've had some of my best experiences on and off the race course whilst on these adventures, which I've tried to share through this blog. I have run up and down things I never thought possible, raced for longer than I ever thought I could and redefined the word steep. Having these races to aim for has also influenced how I've trained back at home - discovering new routes on local hills, giving me a reason to travel further afield to bigger mountains, or finding that motivation to run up 1000m hills twice in one day. Thank you Arc'teryx for your support both when it's gone well and when it hasn't.

I also need to thank Amer Sports who provided me with Salomon footwear for this season's skyraces. These shoes are designed for the skyrace conditions and it is no surprise that my long term foot problems have improved since I've started wearing them.

And finally thanks to everyone who sends me nice messages of support, luck and congratulations either through this blog, twitter or facebook.

Now for some winter miles...

3 comments:

  1. Tess thanks for this blog. I'm running the skyrace for the first time in October...it's nothing like I've done before so want to get things right. Can I ask, were you wearing speedcross 3's? I've just bought some inov8 mudclaw 265's as preferred their profile to the Salomon's. That said, just been reading up and it seems like the x-talons por speed cross are more ideal. What are your thoughts? Thanks

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  2. Tess thanks for this blog. I'm running the skyrace for the first time in October...it's nothing like I've done before so want to get things right. Can I ask, were you wearing speedcross 3's? I've just bought some inov8 mudclaw 265's as preferred their profile to the Salomon's. That said, just been reading up and it seems like the x-talons por speed cross are more ideal. What are your thoughts? Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi there,

    I have run this race twice once in the dry and once in the wet. On the first time in the dry I used Speedcross 3 I think, and in the wet time I used the Salomon Sense. This was the wrong way round and not worth explaining how it ended up being so!

    I would say that if it is dry then you do not need too much grip but if it is wet then you will need something more substantial. I prefer Salomon shoes to inov8s because of the support and cushioning. However I have not worn inov8s for a few years so am not exactly sure what the latest models are like.

    In any case, I would think the x-talons/speedcross would be suitable for all conditions. I feel like the mudclaws wouldn't be quite right as there is a fair bit on decent tracks too.

    Enjoy it, it's fantastic. Just be aware that you seem to keep climbing for well over 2/3 race - pacing is quite critical!

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